Tag Archives: sit-lie

Sit-lie law moves along

By Joanne Zuhl, Staff Writer

Seven months into the enforcement of Portland’s Sidewalk Management Ordinance, there are no lawsuits festering in the wings, no major protests at City Hall, and little in terms of social discourse under the banner of civil rights violations. The absence is notable considering that this plan, which regulates sitting and lying on public sidewalks, was born of nearly a decade of sit-lie regulations drawing all of the above.

Unlike similar city efforts in the past, which essentially prohibited sitting or lying on sidewalks downtown wholesale, the complete sidewalk management plan includes an agenda of actions to alleviate sidewalk problems. It includes a regular, open forum called the Public Sidewalk Management Advisory Committee, with business representatives, community advocates, representatives of city commissioners, police, and anyone interested in attending. As both a watchdog and sounding board for the ordinance, the advisory committee meets monthly to discuss sidewalk management and the ordinance’s performance, under the oversight of Commissioner Amanda Fritz.

“As a participant and an advocate, I always thought the previous ones were unconstitutional because there wasn’t anywhere on downtown sidewalks where people could sit or lie if they didn’t have a place to go, and this ordinance expressly allows people to do that.”

So far, she says, it seems to be working.

“I’m getting far fewer angry messages from all sides,” Fritz says. Fritz says she still gets some messages from tourists who complain about panhandlers, and the local community understands the challenges and is “moving in the right direction,” but that they will always have to contend with more challenges and limited resources. Continue reading

April 30 Editorial: SR once again weighs in on sidewalks

First let us say that we commend Mayor Sam Adams and Commissioner Amanda Fritz for their efforts to create an ordinance that has split the issue of sidewalk management right down the middle. All parties involved are not completely satisfied.

Regardless of the rhetoric being slung, the business community is not happy with this ordinance — it doesn’t go far enough. From some homeless and civil-rights activists’ perspective, it goes to far.  It doesn’t help that both weekly newspapers have handpicked what homeless advocates they would like to give voice to, while ignoring others who have had a voice in this fight over several incarnations — giving the general public little context to decipher the complexity of this issue.

Like it or not, the use of our public sidewalks and how it relates to people experiencing homelessness, public safety and business downtown, has devolved into a decade-long quagmire that some of the smartest minds in our city have yet to figure out.

We’ve heard the whispers — Street Roots is sitting this one out. Must be political. Not so. Anyone who reads SR knows we work to present and dissect ways for the region to improve its systems and approaches to fighting poverty. We’re neither naïve nor entrenched in blind ideology. We know the streets. We live them.

In March, SR gave recommendations for the ordinance, saying we supported the stalemate with the following suggestions: to fund two or three homeless outreach workers, to dedicate funding for a neighborhood non-uniformed police officer to work with outreach workers and organizations working with people experiencing homelessness, and to organize a response team made up of homeless outreach workers who respond to calls regarding people experiencing homelessness and poverty and mental health issues in non-emergency situations on sidewalks during peak hours. We also ask for a six-month review of the ordinance to determine its effectiveness.

And while some of these recommendations have been considered, and even implemented (police working with mental health and homeless outreach workers), the language used around the ordinance by the city is once again drifting off onto a slippery slope of blatantly targeting people on the streets with law-enforcement instead of harm-reductions models like those outlined in our recommendations.

For one, aggressive panhandling is not a crime on the books, but it is regularly described in that context.  Saying that, assault is against the law, and should be met with zero-tolerance. SR doesn’t want anyone, regardless of their housing status, verbally and physically assaulting anyone on Portland’s sidewalks. It’s everything we’re not.

We are disappointed that we haven’t evolved enough as a city that we can’t get beyond the simple notion of framing policy that will ultimately mean not targeting poor people. When this kind of language is used, it usually means it’s being used for a reason. If that reason is to target people on the streets, then history tells us that this ordinance, if passed, will end up right back in the courts and be ruled unconstitutional, and we’ll all be having this conversation again (and again). And honestly, it doesn’t matter much what SR thinks anymore, that’s just the way it is.

Read the ordinance and the FAQ here.

Final sidewalk ordinance and three-page FAQ released by City Hall

Amanda Fritz’s office just released the final Sidewalk Management Plan ordinance and a three-page overview of the law that will be voted on tomorrow.

Final ordinance: FINAL SMP Ordinance_4.29.10

FAQ:Sidewalk Management Plan FAQs FINAL_4.29.10

Posted by Israel Bayer

Sisters to march against sidewalk ordinance

Via Sisters Of The Road…
Sisters Of The Road has been involved in the struggle to keep laws like “Sit-Lie” and the new “Sidewalk Management Ordinance” off the books. Unfortunately, these laws, while often well intentioned, are typically used to target people experiencing homelessness and extreme poverty who have no where else to go. The new Sidewalk Management Ordinance will separate sidewalks downtown and in the Lloyd District into zones. The area closest to walls and shelter will be limited to movement and business activities. If someone needs to sit or lie on the sidewalk, they will be forced to do so in the area of the sidewalk closest to traffic, which is potentially very dangerous because of cars and pollution.  If people do not sit in this area of the sidewalk, they will face being cited and fined.

Portland is a beautiful city that is worth celebrating no matter our socioeconomic status! Sisters and our community will continue working to make Portland a place where all of our basic needs are met. We think it is important to celebrate and struggle at the same time, in order to sustain our movements! Continue reading

Street Roots weighs in on Sidewalk Management Plan

Editorial in the current edition of Street Roots (Oct. 16)

Opportunities lie ahead to build up, not down

There are many reasons to have a doom-and-gloom attitude about the economy and homelessness in Portland. We know businesses are hurting. People are hurting. Workers are feeling the brunt of layoffs and uncertainty heading into the holiday season. There are bills to pay and hungry mouths to feed. That comforting sense of security has long since vanished.

Right alongside all those uncertainties are people who sleep in our doorways, under our bridges and along makeshift paths stretched across our city. It all signals a weary and unforgiving winter ahead.

On the street, the buzz is about the new Sidewalk Management Plan. Street Roots has been getting calls from supporters, organizers, politicians and foundations on what our thoughts are on the Sidewalk Management Plan. So, what do we think?

We think a real opportunity exists to change the way Portland messages and works for with individuals on the streets.

On the front end, the plan is fantastic and builds a base for ongoing support for services, such as public restrooms, that are essential not just for people experiencing poverty, but all Portlanders. But concerning homelessness on our sidewalks and neighborhood corners, there are two ways the city can go: the familiar route of antagonism, or a new path of cooperation.

The city could opt for an anti-panhandling campaign that will fire up the engines of advocates for people on the streets and groups such as the ACLU. If the city goes for the anti-panhandling strategy, the plan risks being polarizing and falling into patterns that have failed many times before in cities across the U.S.  And at the end of the day, it doesn’t get to heart of the problem – which isn’t panhandling per se, so much as it aggressive behavior.

Or the city could choose, through a public education campaign, to engage people on the streets through outreach from social-service agencies and support from the broader community.

What if the general community was asked to give to services and support a larger spectrum of goals set out to curb the problem without saying don’t give to panhandlers? In the end, it’s not the city’s responsibility to direct or discourage any particular form of individual charity, but it is entirely appropriate for the city to spread the word on how people can plug in to and support the great programs Portland offers. Services that exist for people experiencing homelessness are strained, just like small and large businesses in this economy, and that strain ripples across the streets.

Why not beef the outreach up and engage people into getting into housing and accessing services? For those who choose to step over the line and commit aggressive acts, there are tools for addressing that behavior. Not everyone is kind, housed or homeless. There has to be personal accountability on the streets and it’s that simple. Why not educate people on the streets to show kindness and respect when facing adversity and survival? Street Roots does it every day with its vendor program, and it works.

If we embrace the approach of what we can do, instead of what we can’t, we might not have to read about police stings and anti-panhandling campaigns anymore. And instead of seeing negative stereotypes reinforced in the daily headlines, we might get some good news about a city that chooses to stand up together, instead of tearing one another down.

Extra! Extra!

sept0409page1They say rain is headed our way, which means bring a plastic bag when you head out to pick up your new copy of Street Roots. These colors don’t run, but the paper gets sticky when wet. Here’s what’s fit to print this week:

Will success spoil Michael Franti? The hip hop/reggae rocker of Spearhead has his first megahit riding up the charts, but he’s keeping his (bare) feet on the ground with his grassroots activism. Joanne Zuhl spoke to Franti in advance of the band’s concert at the Roseland.

Healing lessons: How the U.S. can adopt a health care system that’s fairer and costs less. Adam Hyla interviews “Healing of America” author and researcher T.R. Reid.

Reuse, recycle, respect: Portland re-use artist Taylor Cass Stevenson reports on her travels and the obstacles for urban recyclers in the Third World.

Children of all ages: Portland photographer John Ryan Brubaker stopped by The Circus Project’s rehearsal in advance of their debut – a show o benefit the nonprofit’s work with at-risk and homeless youths.

All this and a crossword puzzle! Yes, you clamored and our vendors delivered the message loud and clear. Each edition of Street Roots will now feature a crossword puzzle on the back page, and we hope to hear from you as we work to put a Street Roots spin on each one. Thanks for your input and your support of our dynamic vendor team!

Discuss sit-lie at Street Roots blog…

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Two op-eds in the Oregonian discuss the merits of the sit-lie ordinance. One from the very well respected and engaging Central Precinct Commander Mike Reese. The Commander argues that the sit-lie ordinance is needed for the communities quality of life.

With the ruling in June, the only tool police now have to address sidewalk obstruction is the state disorderly conduct statute, a criminal offense, which raises the question: Should the police arrest someone engaged in sidewalk obstruction using a criminal statute? It seems a little like driving a thumbtack with a sledgehammer.

The ordinance, on the other hand, strikes a balance that allows police to keep the sidewalks free for pedestrian travel while recognizing the many exceptions that may legitimately apply (people waiting for goods or services such as TriMet riders, medical issues and protests). The police can only issue citations after warning a person that their behavior is a problem, and the charge is a violation that can result in community service or a fine.

Most important to note is that the majority of citations have been issued to “road warriors,” young adults between 18 and 30 years of age. They’re the ones engaged in aggressive panhandling and intimidating behavior in downtown. I’ve talked to nearly a hundred of these young adults over the past three years. Most are addicted to heroin or alcohol. They travel across the country and don’t have ties to our community.

The op-ed continues…

The sidewalk obstruction ordinance is one of the few tools the police have that allows us to engage the road warriors and local street youth in a fairly low-level enforcement manner. In fact, I’ve had several “sidewalk” conversations with the young woman whose case resulted in the recent court ruling. My hope is that this dialogue will help support and encourage her to become clean, sober and permanently housed.

The notion that being homeless means that you can engage in anti-social behavior is not reasonable. So is the idea that the city cannot reasonably regulate the sidewalks in downtown for the common good. Somehow all of us have to find a way to get along. We as a community have to decide what behavior is acceptable and what is not.

As part of the SAFE process, homeless providers and advocates, business leaders, downtown residents and police officers came to the same conclusion: Blocking sidewalks and intimidating other people is not acceptable. Through this ordinance, we had an effective way to address this behavior. The sidewalk obstruction ordinance made downtown a more welcoming and safe place for everyone.

Read Reese’s entire op-ed here.

Genny Nelson, co-founder of Sisters Of The Road argues that outlawing homelessness will not make it go away.

With shelters full and an adequate number of affordable housing units not yet built, we need to stop punishing people dealing with homelessness for human survival activities like sleeping, sitting or lying down outside.

For years now, local efforts across the country to deal with growing homeless populations often start with innocuous-sounding language about the “quality of life” of the housed and business sectors of the community. Or perhaps they are billed as an effort to ensure that communities don’t become a “magnet for the homeless” or, as in Portland, that there is “street access for everyone.”

But over time, more laws and ordinances get passed, and they all have one primary common goal: to remove the presence and resulting impact of people without housing from local communities.

She continues…

Police who handed out warnings reported being told: I have no place to go; I’m trying to get some sleep; I’m tired of standing; I don’t have a house; My legs are hurting me; and I was only sitting for a moment to rest. When these men and women are unable to pay a fine due to their poverty, and if they are instructed to attend community court but don’t because they contend the ordinance violates their civil rights, they end up with a warrant out for their arrest. Criminalizing homelessness makes no sense.

Remember, local governments cannot legally discriminate against people strictly because they do not have housing. Federal protections prohibit local and state governments from removing people from their communities due to the color of their skin or their economic/employment status.

Nelson ends her op-ed by noting,

It is impossible to fill a $54 billion housing hole with a mere $1.4 billion of annual homelessness-assistance funding and 10-year plans to end homelessness.

If we want to address homelessness in the U.S., we need to stop looking at homeless people as “them,” and we need to start looking at us. If we believe our government represents us, it is we, the people, who must pressure our elected officials to make a real commitment to restore funding for affordable housing. Outlawing homelessness won’t make it go away; nothing ends homelessness like a home.

Read the entire Nelson op-ed here.

Read the history of the sit-lie ordinance in Portland.

Read recent Street Roots editorial on sit-lie.

Discuss...

Photo by Frank Furter.

Posted by Israel Bayer.

What does the arrest of a Harvard Professor and people on the streets in Portland have in common? Disorderly conduct.

Time Magazine looks at the disorderly conduct statute in an article today titled, The Gates case: When disorderly conduct is a Cop’s judgment call. The article touches on the history of the law and makes a case that more than any other law, disorderly conduct calls for officers to use their own discretion when making an arrest.

In Portland, the police bureau is now using disorderly conduct in replace of the sit-lie law. The City of Portland is currently mulling over what a recent verdict by a judge ruling the sit-lie unconstitutional means. In an interview on July 10, city commissioner Amanda Fritz told Street Roots her concerns about using disorderly conduct as a tool to police behavior, specifically with folks on the streets.

It (the sit-lie verdict) also highlights a concern that Commissioner Fish raised in terms of criminalizing homelessness. What the court ruling said was, you can’t do (sit-lie) this because state law says we have a disorderly conduct law that comes with a maximum of one year in prison.

We have concerns about the charge from advocates that sit-lie criminalizes homeless people, when it fact, it made it a citation rather than a misdemeanor.

I.B.: But isn’t forfeiting your right to counsel through a citation process a violation of a person’s civil rights?

A.F.: You’re right, there are a lot of different twists and turns with this issue. But in my six months at City Hall I’ve come to realize that we all care about the homeless and having a place to go, and that the sidewalk obstruction ordinance was truly a tool meant to get people services.

I.B.: Have the city attorney or others at City Hall inquired into why the sit-lie law was needed then, if something else was in place?

A.F.: Obviously, we wanted something that wasn’t criminalizing people and throwing people in jail for being homeless.

I.B.: So the police bureau and the business community have been advocating all this time to decriminalize homelessness?

A.F.: I don’t know what the motivation was because I wasn’t involved at that time. What we need to look at now is what options do we have and move forward.

In the meantime, the city has held two well-attended community forums on the law and the services attached it. It’s unclear what the next steps are and if the city plans on letting officers continue to make judgment calls on behavior on Portland’s downtown streets, specifically when an individual is sitting or lying on a sidewalk.

Posted by Israel Bayer

Extra! Extra!

july1009page1The cool breezes call for a cup of joe and a seat outside of your favorite café with your favorite newspaper. The new Street Roots comes out tomorrow morning and your friendly neighborhood vendor will be standing sentry with all this in his or her hands:

Balancing act: Ted Wheeler wants to talk about urban renewal areas. Here’s why you should listen. Joanne Zuhl interviews the Multnomah County chairman.

Precinct shuffle brings new faces, attitudes into Southeast: Amanda Waldroupe explores what it means for Central Precinct to assume authority over Portland’s Southeast neighborhoods.

‘This is a bigger issue:’ An interview by Israel Bayer with City Commissioner Amanda Fritz on the latest decisions surrounding sit-lie and street access.

The eye of the beholder: From the Great Depression to modern day, ‘Hobos to Street People’ showcases artists’ interpretation of poverty and homelessness.

And so much more that 16 pages can barely hold it all. But we did it again – all for the price of $1! So pour a tall one and support fair trade by picking up a copy of Street Roots.

Posted by Joanne Zuhl

Scarecrow art highlights sit-lie ordinance

SitLie_CourtHouse2

An artist going by the name Frank Furter has been creating scarecrow installations around downtown to raise awareness about the sit-lie ordinance. This scarecrow on the corner of 5th & Morrison is holding a sign that reads, “Sit-lie, this city-wide ordinance was deemed unconstitutional by a circuit court. Sit-lie in unity to the Supreme Court. Freedom for All.” See more pics below. Continue reading

Sit-lie enforcement has officially been suspended

Via the Portland Police Bureau…. (3:00P.M.)

policememo

Sit-lie a cliche of obstructionism

sit-lie2The new ruling that the sit-lie law is unconstitutional caught Street Roots off guard. According to sources at City Hall, it also caught the city on its heels.

Rumor has it that staffers there are scrambling to try to figure out what exactly the ruling means.

Street Roots thinks it’s clear to the broader public what the ruling means and what City Hall should do. For years, seven to be exact, the sit-lie ordinance has become a wedge issue in our community. Not to mention that the law infringes on the rights of Portlanders, specifically homeless folks.

The sit-lie ordinance is being evaluated in community-wide discussions led by City Commissioners Nick Fish and Amanda Fritz to determine the long-term viability of the law. We have a hunch that the process will not shed any new light on the subject.

This law is more or less a waste of everyone’s time.

It’s time to cut bait. Stop beating a dead horse. The police bureau, private security groups and the business community need to learn to live without the sit-lie ordinance.

The simple fact of the matter is, we have individuals experiencing homelessness and poverty that live and contribute in our community. We may not always like the way a few bad apples create tension on the streets, but it’s time to turn over a new leaf and look at more progressive and innovative ideas when thinking about these issues.

The Street Access For Everyone (SAFE) workgroup, made up of members from the business community, homeless advocates and concerned citizens, has created a framework on which to work together. We don’t think this should be lost.

Street Roots recently joined the Portland Business Alliance (PBA) in the same vein. We believe that while we don’t always agree on specific issues, the PBA and the larger business community do care about people experiencing homelessness. And we have to find a way to breakthrough the tired rhetoric. Here’s our chance.

In the past two years, the city and the PBA have supported the SAFE committee to help build more park benches and to open public restrooms downtown — things that benefit both the housed and homeless communities. They have worked to create day access space for people on the streets to have a welcoming place to go and have created the capacity for a homeless women’s shelter to increase its hours to 24/7. The shame of the sit-lie law only tarnished these worthy efforts.

What if the discussion could move on to what homeless folks can do alongside the business community? How can we be involved in cleaning blighted areas or helping police drug dealers and predators that prey on people on the streets? We can develop a relationship in the spirit of collaboration instead of confrontation, and share the concept that the people on the streets are a part of the solutions we all seek.

None of this is possible with an ordinance that tells people not be a part of the community at-large. It’s time to move along.

Read the latest news and the seven year history of the ordinance.

Sit-lie update and seven year history

Sit-lie1Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Stephen K. Bushong has ruled that the city of Portland’s sidewalk-obstruction ordinance — commonly referred to as sit-lie, unconstitutionally exceeds the city’s authority.

The ruling was issued June 19, and grants the motion to dismiss a sit-lie case being defended by attorney Clayton Lance.

“This ordinances has been found unconstitutional on three separate and distinct grounds,” Lance told Street Roots. “That’s a heck of a lot of unconstitutionality for one little ordinance out of the city. It just is not going to work and they just keep trying to make it fit, and it will never be able to fit, in my opinion.”

The sit-lie law prohibits sitting or lying on downtown sidewalks between the hours of 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. The city has said that it is to keep the sidewalks free of obstructions. Records show that the majority of people cited under the law are homeless.

Judge Bushong ruled that the city’s law conflicts with and is pre-empted by state law; State v. Robison, which Lance says already allows the city to penalize people for obstructing sidewalks.

“The (sit-lie) ordinance does not at all deal with obstruction. That’s a myth,” Lance said. “It was to move the transient and the homeless because the transient and homeless were sitting on the sidewalks in downtown Portland. Nothing else.”

As Lance noted, this is the latest round in the city’s failed attempts to institute a sit-lie law. In 2004, Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Marilyn Litzenberger ruled that the city’s 2003 version of the ordinance was unconstitutionally vague and overbroad. The current version was a response to that ruling with more specific information on what was and was not prohibited. The Court of Appeals further ruled that the 2003 version was pre-empted by state law, the same as Bushong’s ruling.

“In the United States, we fundamentally respect the rights of individuals to meet, to assemble, to communicate and to use public property. And (the city’s) attempts at curtailing those fundamental rights have been unconstitutional every step of the way.”
It is presumed by many that the city will revise its ordinance for another round. Lance says he is ready to defend any charges under the ordinance for free.

“Because of social justice and compassion,” Lance said. “We need to have social justice and compassion. And this law lacks that completely.”

In May, the City Council voted 4-1 to extend the ordinance until October, with the only dissenting voice on the council being Commissioner Randy Leonard.
City Commissioners Nick Fish and Amanda Fritz are currently leading a community process for input on the controversial ordinance.

Fritz told Street Roots she is reviewing the ruling and communicating with the City Attorney’s office before making a formal comment.

Fritz does say, “I am currently hoping our public meetings over the summer will go ahead as planned, as now more than ever we need to talk together to figure out solutions that work for everyone.”

“I never supported the sit-lie, because of its effect on some of our most vulnerable citizens,” says Leonard.  “I am happy the courts agree.”

“Everyone at City Hall is circling the wagons and trying to figure out next steps,” says Matt Grumm with Police Commissioner Dan Saltzman’s office. “People are aware of the decision and next week we will have a little more clarity.”

Asked if the police are currently enforcing the law after the ruling, Grumm says, “The commissioner has not asked the police to stop or discontinue with enforcement.”

The court’s ruling was welcome news at Sisters Of The Road, which has campaigned against the ordinance since its creation.

“This ruling re-affirms what Sisters has known from the beginning,” says Brendan Phillips with Sisters Of The Road. “The sit-lie law violates the human rights of Portlanders, it (also) violates the constitutional rights of Portlanders and hopefully this (ruling) will lead the city to immediately repeal the ordinance.”

Seven years of sit-lie; A history of Portland’s sidewalk suits

Continue reading

Breaking news: Judge rules sit-lie law unconstitutional

sit-lie2(3:00 P.M.) Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Stephen K. Bushong has ruled that the city of Portland’s sidewalk-obstruction ordinance – commonly referred to as sit-lie, unconstitutionally exceeds the city’s authority.

The ruling was released today, and grants the motion to dismiss a sit-lie case being defended by attorney Clayton Lance.

“This ordinances has been found unconstitutional on three separate and distinct ground,” Lance told Street Roots. “That’s a heck of a lot of unconstitutionality for one little ordinance out of the city. It just is not going to work and they just keep trying to make it fit, and it will never be able to fit in my opinion.”

The sit-lie law prohibits sitting or lying on downtown sidewalks between the hours of 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. The city has maintained it is to keep the sidewalks free of obstructions. Records show that the majority of people cited under the law are homeless.

Judge Bushong ruled that the city’s law conflicts with and is preempted by state law; State v. Robison, which Lance says already allows the city to penalize people for obstructing sidewalks.

“The (sit-lie) ordinance does not at all deal with obstruction. That’s a myth,” Lance said.“It was to move the transient and the homeless because the transient and homeless were sitting on the sidewalks in downtown Portland. Nothing else.”

As Lance noted, this is the latest round in the city’s failed attempts to institute a sit-lie law. In 2004, Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Marilyn Litzenberger ruled that the city’s 2003 version of the ordinance was unconstitutionally vague and overbroad. The current version was a response to that ruling with more specific information on what was and was not prohibited. The Court of Appeals further ruled that the 2003 version was preempted by state law, the same as Bushong’s ruling.

“In the United States, we fundamentally respect the rights of individuals to meet, to assemble, to communicate and to use public property. And (the city’s) attempts at curtailing those fundamental rights have been unconstitutional every step of the way.”

It is altogether likely the city will revise its ordinance for another round. Lance says he is ready to defend any charges under the ordinance for free.

“Because of social justice and compassion,” Lance said. “We need to have social justice and compassion. And this law lacks that completely.”

Update: City Commissioner Amanda Fritz told Street Roots she is reviewing the ruling and communicating with the City Attorney’s office before making a formal comment. She does say though, “I am currently hoping our public meetings over the summer will go ahead as planned, as now more than ever we need to talk together to figure out solutions that work for everyone.” Read more about the public meetings.

A judge is also suppose to rule this week on weather or not a lawsuit brought against the city by the Oregon Law Center on the camping ordinance should be heard.

Street Roots coverage from the last time sit-lie was ruled unconstitutional in 2004.

Sit-lie scarecrow downtown

These photos were snapped today at 3rd and Glisan by Street Roots Rose City Resource Specialist Eddy Barbosa.

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Sit-lie1