Tag Archives: Mary Nolan

Candidates talk on housing and human services

Mayoral and City Council candidates Charlie Hales, Jefferson Smith, Amanda Fritz and Mary Nolan answer questions earlier this month at a housing and homelessness forum put on by Oregon On, Street Roots, 211info, JOIN and the Community Alliance of Tenants. The forum co-sponsored by Portland Community College drew around 150 people.

Below are three questions the organizations asked the candidates prior to the forum. Continue reading

Your call: Mayoral and City Council candidates question on their opponent

Mayoral and City Council candidates Charlie Hales, Jefferson Smith, Amanda Fritz and Mary Nolan take a shot at Street Roots’ questions for the future of Portland.

4. What do you fear most for the city if your opponent is elected? Continue reading

Your call: Mayoral and City Council candidates question panhandling, sidewalks

Mayoral and City Council candidates Charlie Hales, Jefferson Smith, Amanda Fritz and Mary Nolan take a shot at Street Roots’ questions for the future of Portland.

3. Many issues of livability can become sticking points on the streets of Portland. Please state your position on the following topics: Support for the current Sidewalk Management Plan, panhandling and the future of Right 2 Dream Too. Continue reading

Your call: Mayoral and City Council candidates question on JTTF

Mayoral and City Council candidates Charlie Hales, Jefferson Smith, Amanda Fritz and Mary Nolan take a shot at Street Roots’ questions for the future of Portland.

2. The issue of local law enforcement interfacing directly with federal agencies such as the CIA and FBI is highly controversial — from cooperating with the surveillance-oriented fusion centers in Salem and Portland, to the city police participating in the Joint Terrorism Task Force. The FBI also have been involved in questionable investigations, such as the Christmas tree bomber case and raiding the homes of so-called anarchists. Where do you stand on our participation in the JTTF, and how far should our police cooperate with these federal agencies? Continue reading

Your call: Mayoral and City Council candidates question on police, mental health

Mayoral and City Council candidates Charlie Hales, Jefferson Smith, Amanda Fritz and Mary Nolan take a shot at Street Roots’ questions for the future of Portland.

1. The Department of Justice investigation into the Portland Police Bureau revealed, among other things, two serious problems. One being that our police use excessive force on people perceived to have a mental illness, due to deficiencies in policy, training and supervision. The other serious problem is failings in our mental health support network, from triage sites to engagement with health providers. What will you do to correct these problems? Continue reading

Extra! Extra!

The ballots are coming! The ballots are coming! Soon it will all be over but the counting. Until then, stay on the ball with the latest edition of Street Roots, packed with information about the upcoming election, and much, much more. Here’s what’s rolling on the press:

Your call: Mayoral and City Council candidates Charlie Hales, Jefferson Smith, Amanda Fritz and Mary Nolan take a shot at Street Roots’ questions for the future of Portland.

Measuring up: Street Roots weighs in on the important state and local measures up for consideration.

Survivors’ stories: Three women reflect on what it means to escape the grip of domestic violence.

Ninety-nine percent solution: Professor Joseph Stiglitz, author and Nobel Prize winner in economics, is pleased to see that his latest book ‘The Price of Inequality’ is already grabbing the attention of world leaders.

Plus, the second in a series of reports by Dr. Samuel Metz, health care professional and activist, on what Obamacare really means for Oregonians. And the Partnership for Safety and Justice checks in on the ongoing issue of federal policy and local police enforcement mingling over immigration. And of course, we’re packed with powerful poetry from the streets. Pick up your copy first thing Friday morning and your weekend will be off to a great start! Thank you!

Candidates on housing and homelessness: Fritz, Nolan

City Council: Position 1

With the primary election happening, Street Roots asked the leading mayoral and city council candidates one question: If elected what three things will you do to improve the state of homelessness and affordable housing in Portland?

Amanda Fritz

Check my record — what I have done in my first three years serving on the Portland City Council is what housing advocates and people concerned about houselessness can continue to depend on from me in my second term.

I have supported significant General Fund allocations for affordable housing, the safety net, and services for people experiencing homelessness, and I will continue to do so. I have prioritized requests for housing funding, particularly short term rental assistance and emergency assistance. I set up a process giving citizens real input into the city’s state and federal priorities, and I supported prioritizing requesting increased federal housing assistance on our national legislative lobbying agenda. When we climb out of the recession and homeowners are no longer upside-down on mortgage equity, I will support changes statewide generating more resources for affordable housing, such as the proposed real estate transfer tax.

I will continue to support quality affordable accessible rental housing. I received the Low Income Housing Champion award from the Community Alliance of Tenants in 2009. I supported funding for additional housing inspectors in BDS, and for measures holding banks more accountable for maintenance of foreclosed properties.

As a public official and private citizen, I will continue to support community partners, giving my time and my personal family income to nonprofits supporting housing, including JOIN, Proud Ground, Oregon ON, Human Solutions, Rose Haven, Bradley Angle, Portland Women’s Crisis Line, Volunteers of America, YWCA, REACH, Rose CDC, Habitat for Humanity, New Avenues for Youth, Janus Youth Programs, Central City Concern, Outside In, p:ear, The Salvation Army, Street Roots, Sisters of the Road, faith-based organizations, and more.  I want to continue to partner with Portlanders who care about housing.

Read an in-depth interview with Amanda Fritz with Street Roots.

Mary Nolan

Meeting the challenges faced by our houseless fellow Portlanders and those struggling under the cost of housing will take big efforts by the city, county, Home Forward, non-profit housing partners and conscientious private developers of housing.

As city commissioner, I will focus most immediately on:

Predictability of city policies on housing funding, regulatory framework and permit issuance (both turn-around and cost). Specifically, city goals emphasize affordable housing within affordable commutes of jobs, but the agencies too often impose onerous conditions or costs on people trying to develop work-force housing in close-in neighborhoods. I will work to remove those inconsistencies. Continue reading

Amanda Fritz, Mary Nolan and money: The dollars and cents behind the race

Left to right: Amanda Fritz, Mary Nolan

By Janice Thompson, Contributing  Columnist

Incumbent City Commissioner Amanda Fritz is being challenged by Representative Mary Nolan who has represented southwest Portland in the Oregon House since 2001. In other words, two current elected officials are facing off in the Position 1 race for Portland City Council. A third candidate, Teresa Raiford, has filed to run in this election but has only received one $102 contribution.

So far, Mary Nolan has raised $212,248 for this contest and has $171,503 on hand while Amanda Fritz has raised $75,831 and has $41,065 available now for continued campaign spending. (These figures are based on data downloaded from the state’s campaign finance system, ORESTAR, on Feb. 12., Oregon’s campaign must report each contribution within 30 days after it is received and within seven days of receipt during the six weeks prior to an election. This continuous reporting means that these figures will have been updated by the time this article is published.)

Fritz started her fundraising from zero because she won her City Council position using the Voter-Owned Elections reform program. An under-reported element of that reform program was that if a participating candidate was elected, he or she retained no war chest and was barred from fundraising between campaigns. Retention of the reform system was defeated in November 2010 by a narrow 49.6 percent margin. Continue reading

City Council candidates weigh in on housing, homeless issues

Candidates for City Commissioner (left to right) incumbent Amanda Fritz, State Rep. Mary Nolan, Teressa Raiford, Jeri Sundvall-Williams and Steve Novick. Photo by Israel Bayer.

By Joanne Zuhl
Staff writer

New and familiar faces among the candidates for City Council addressed an invested audience on issues of affordable housing and homelessness this afternoon.

The City Commissioner Candidates’ Forum on Housing brought together the leading contenders for the two council seats on the ballot next Spring. Candidates Amanda Fritz, Mary Nolan and Teressa Raiford are contending for the Commissioner 1 position, currently held by Fritz. And candidates Jeri Sundvall-Williams and Steve Novick were there for the Commissioner 4 position, which is being vacated by Randy Leonard.

The panel fielded questions prepared by the event sponsors on issues of gentrification, job creation, funding for affordable housing, civil rights for the poor and streamlining bureaucracy. Oregon Opportunity Network, JOIN, 211info and Street Roots sponsored the event, which was held at the First Unitarian Church in Downtown Portland.

One underlying theme through several of the queries had to deal with preserving what we have, and finding new resources for what we need.

Continue reading

Candidate interview: Mary Nolan

By Amanda Waldroupe, Staff Writer

Oregon Rep. Mary Nolan has been a name in politics for more than a decade down in Salem. Now she’s hoping to bend a few ears at City Hall. Nolan is in the race to unseat City Commissioner Amanda Fritz.

Nolan was first elected to serve downtown and Southwest Portland in 2000. She held a variety of leadership roles, including co-chairing the budget writing Ways and Means Committee, and as Democratic Caucus Leader and Speaker Pro-Tempore, the number two position to the Speaker of the House.

Before serving in the Legislature, Nolan was CEO of AvroTec, an aviation supplies company in Hillsboro. She also worked as director of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services.

Nolan attended Dartmouth College, majoring in mathematics. Her freshman year was the first year Dartmouth admitted women, and Nolan often was the only woman in her classes.

“For the most part, it was a non-event,” she says. “I had one professor who clearly was unhappy that the college had decided to admit women. He would ask occasionally for the female interpretation of this theorem or that theorem. I was able to handle my own, but it was a bit awkward.”

Those classroom experiences prepared Nolan, in some ways, for the professional world. Men still largely dominate the technical and engineering world, and there were many other times when Nolan found herself being the only woman in the room. “Being able to handle that with some aplomb is a very valuable skill,” she says.

Amanda Waldroupe: Why are you running for City Council?

Mary Nolan: The City Council needs to be more focused on providing efficient, respectful, and timely services that support our neighborhood livability, economic prosperity, and assure safety for all citizens. We’ve sort of become distracted over the last several years. Continue reading